Marvin Walberg

Getting Hired, the weekly job search advice newspaper column, was written by Marvin Walberg and was published nationally in newspapers and websites by The Scripps Howard News Service from 1991 -- 2013. Marvin Walberg has a lifetime of sales experience and has concentrated on the job search process for over 20 years.

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How You Can Get The Job:
15 Things To Do & Say To Help Clinch An Offer

 

While the unemployment rate has continued to decline this year, there are still many more applicants for each and every job opening. As a result, competition remains extremely high and job-seekers need to differentiate themselves in order to just get an interview, as well as during it and after it’s over, according to OI Partners, a leading global coaching and leadership development and consulting firm.

OI Partners surveyed its career professionals to uncover key language, tactics and strategies that are proving to be most effective in helping job seekers successfully land and respond to interview opportunities.

According to Patty Prosser, chair of OI Partners, following are the top 15 things to do and say to help you clinch a job offer:

1. Desire – how much do you want the job? An interviewer wants to ascertain how much the job means to you. At the end of an interview, say: "When I came here today, I thought there was a good fit between the needs of the job and my skills and experience. But, after talking, I can see this position is exactly the kind of opportunity and challenge I've been looking for.” But not just at the end of the interview – one can express an interest a few times. For example " This is sounding like a very good fit for me,” or "I'm confident I could hit the ground running."

2. Leave-behind: “Prepare something to leave behind at the end of or to use during the interview. This could be your analysis of the company’s needs or a portfolio of your work that demonstrates how your skills, talents and experience align with the position’s requirements and needs,” said Prosser. Or prepare a plan on how you would approach starting the position, which would demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of the job.

3. Unusual questions: “Be ready for strange or unusual interview questions. They are not being asked to trick you, but to reveal qualities that can't be determined from your resume. The questions are designed to discover how you think, handle unexpected problems and situations, whether you are a good fit for their culture, and how creative you are. Make a list of possible questions, be familiar with why they are being asked, and rehearse potential answers,” Prosser added. For example: “If you only had six months to live, what would you do with the time?’ Or “How many trees would you say are in Yellowstone National Park?”

4. Tell a story: Job applicants are more often being asked to tell interviewers a story. Compose it in advance and relate it to the needs of the organization or job for which you are applying. It’s an opportunity to showcase your humor as well as your creative side. You should relate a real-life story in response to answering any number of questions as a dovetail to your answer, by saying: "For example (and tell a short story)."Think of it as selling by using an anecdote.

5. Compliment the company: “Find an aspect of the organization's work to which you can offer a compliment, such as the quality of their products or services or their involvement with charitable causes. Have facts and figures available to include in your compliment. If you are interviewing for a retail or consumer products company, visit one of their stores prior to the interview or check out the product in a store so you can comment on it during the interview," said Prosser.

6. Compliment the interviewer: Review your interviewer’s LinkedIn profile and conduct an Internet search before your meeting. Compile some complimentary things to say, such as how you are impressed by his or her advanced degrees, an article he or she wrote, or a quote in a newspaper. Have the LinkedIn profile printed out.

7. Contributive Value: “Practice ‘contributive value’ and include others in credit for your accomplishments, instead of attributing them solely to your own efforts,” said Prosser.  Example: “After a brainstorming session, my team members and I came up with a solution for a key customer problem that involved bringing in employees from different parts of our company.”

8. Show enthusiasm: Companies want people who are enthusiastic and excited about working with them. Be able to communicate what about the company’s products or services inspires you and how you can convey that in your daily work.

9. Display your personality: When responding to the question, ‘Tell me about yourself,’ it’s important to share your personal side and not only your business accomplishments. Articulate what makes you unique as a person and employee. Appear confident and upbeat.

10. Opportunity knocking: Emphasize that you regard the job as a life plan and learning opportunity. Say: “I am not looking for just a job; I am looking for a career.” Also, when asked about salary requirements, say: “I am more interested in the experience I will receive than the paycheck I will get.”

11. Team spirit: Being a team player is the number one characteristic employers are looking for in job-seekers, according to an OI Partners survey. With work forces still lean, 7 out of 10 employers said being able to accomplish goals with others is the most important trait they desire. It is beneficial that you be viewed as a collaborative problem-solver. This is a great time to use another story, about a team- oriented accomplishment – keep it real and brief.

12. How you add value: Companies want to know how you can add value to them. Adapt your message to the company you are targeting by tying it into the current goals and mission of the organization. Ensure that your value is considered current and relevant to the employer.

13. Leadership qualities: With most companies developing their future leaders from within their organizations, rather than recruiting from outside, they are looking for workers with high leadership potential. Include specific examples of how your leadership of a project influenced a team or drove results.

14. Express passion: In cover letters and during the interview, express that you are passionate about a facet of the job you are applying for, such as customer service, marketing, or problem-solving.

15. New knowledge and skills: Companies want to hire employees with tomorrow's knowledge today. Learning can include courses you are taking and degrees you are pursuing, participating in webinars, attending technology expos and trade shows and online software courses. Relate what you are learning to how this can make you a great hire.

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<< New text box >>Do what others fail to do!

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Job Search Facts You Need To Know

by Robin Ryan Author of  "60 Seconds & You're Hired"

                                                                                          

Job hunting is a slow process. A lot of frustration and time and employers seem to move at a snail's pace when you are searching for that next career move. Here are eight key JOB SEARCH FACTS you likely don't know but should.

  1. US Dept. of Labor states that 63% of new jobs are secured by using networking.
  2. There were 4.6 million job openings as of July 1 2014. Approximately 80% of available jobs are never advertised.
  3. The average number of people who apply for any given job: 118.
  4. Length of time for people over age 45 to land a new job is over 6 months.
  5. Many companies use talent-management software to screen resumes, weeding out over 50% of applications before any individual ever looks at a resume or cover letter.
  6. On average, a job interview last 40 minutes.
  7. LinkedIn's research states that 48% of people apply for jobs using their phones.
  8. In the U.S., 42% of professionals are uncomfortable negotiating salary. By not negotiating, an individual stands to lose more than $500,000 by the time they reach 60.

Why are these facts so useful and important?

 

#1 Learn the process. About 80% of the jobs lie in the hidden job market. Knowing how to uncover them and apply effectively is important. Networking is the most successful technique yet most people do it poorly if at all. Read books or take a class to learn what works in today's job market.

 

#2. Target Your Resume. You'll cut down your search time if you know the job title you seek and can articulate that to friends (for networking) as well as employers. Be sure your resume is no more than 2 pages. Focus it on stressing you major accomplishments and the results you've delivered. Do not fill the page with boring job descriptions no one will read.

 

#3. Be ready with your 60 Seconds Sell. Interviews are a stressful time for the hiring manager. They don't want to make a mistake and hire the wrong candidate. So prepare your 60 Second Sell (outlined in the book 60 Seconds & You're Hired). This is your verbal business card that concisely summarizes your 5 top selling points on why you can do the job. It's the ideal way to begin an interview and the perfect answer to the opening question, "Tell me about yourself."  

 

#4. Negotiate Your New Job's Salary!  Most employers today start a job offer by beginning with a lower salary than that employer is willing to pay. By asking for more you can be reward with more dollars in that next pay check. Being afraid, insecure or just not knowing are expensive problems you can easily solve. Reiterate the value you bring noting your key experience and skills. Listen to my Salary Negotiations Strategies CD so you don't get cheated out of any money you could be earning by asking correctly.

 

© 2014 Robin Ryan all rights reserved.

 

Robin Ryan is America's leading career authority. She's appeared on 1500 TV & radio shows including Oprah, Dr Phil, Cnn, ABC News and NPR.  Robin has a career counseling practice working with works with individual clients across the US helping them land better jobs. For more career help visit: www.RobinRyan.com

 

 

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Get hired by speeding up the :process"!
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Top 10 job searchmistakes.
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The Essential Interview Handbook
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5 Ways to improve your resume.
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Are you Relevant?
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Critical pitfalls in job searching.
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Procrastination.
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Bad news sells!
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"The Hidden Job Market"
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Plan ahead -- don't skip steps!
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Target your job search.
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Dealing with stress and frustration in your search.
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Dress like you mean business!
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Tips for "older" job seekers.
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Dealing with gaps in employment history.
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Maintain job security.
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Interview stumbles.
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Top two resume mistakes.
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Don't find fault. Find a solution.
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When interviewer asks for social media info.
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Cover Letters
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Customer Service
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Resume Critique
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First impressions.
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Communication
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Cover Letters
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Why you left yuour last job.
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Introduction to ntworking
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Tips forrebounding from layoff.
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Start new job on right foot.
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Transferring military experience to civilian workplace skills.
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Be your own advocate in ttoday's workplace.
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Tis the season.
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Tips for rebounding from a layoff.
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The easiest thingdo do is be nice to others.
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Tips for recent college graduates.
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10 words to omit from your resume
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Wish List for 2013
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Tips to strengthen your career security
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"If you don't ask, you'll never get!"
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Decrease your rish of being affected by economic downturn.
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A new twist on networking.
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Validate that you arfe the best fit.
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Handle the tough interview questions.
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Do this before your next interview.
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Minimum wage?
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13 ways to improve your job search.
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How to accept your new job.
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